Gloria Velasquez

BOOK COLLECTION

  • ROOSEVELT HIGH SERIES
  • I USED TO BE A SUPERWOMAN
  • XICANA ON THE RUN
  • TOY SOLDIERS AND DOLLS
  • JUANITA FIGHTS THE SCHOOL BOARD


    Gloria Velasquez

    When Juanita’s dreams of being the first in her family to graduate from high school are thwarted by an expulsion, the young Mexican-American girl enlists the help of a lawyer and the school counselor to fight discrimination at her alma mater. This is the first novel in Gloria Velásquez’s Roosevelt High School Series, which features a multiracial group of teenaged students who must individually face social and cultural issues (such as violence, sexuality, and prejudice) inescapable among young adults today.

    MAYA'S DIVIDED WORLD


    Gloria Velasquez

    Maya’s well-ordered and productive high school life receives an unwelcome jolt when her parents announce their impending divorce. How Maya copes with this blow and the reaction of her friends and family to her disorientation makes for engrossing reading in this second installment of the series.

    “...the author does a nice job of giving readers a window into the culture and providing some positive role models.” — BOOKLIST

    TOMMY STANDS ALONE


    Gloria Velasquez

    The third novel in the series focuses on the difficult issue of a young man’s struggle with his sexual orientation—a conflict made more difficult by his family’s traditional Hispanic expectations.

    “Velásquez has written an engaging story that will help teens, gay and straight, to better understand the consequences of homophobia.” — BOOKLIST

    RINA'S FAMILY SECRET


    Gloria Velasquez

    This compelling novel portrays, with realism and compassion, one young adult’s experience with domestic violence and her attempts to keep it a secret from her friends.

    “...a powerful story... recommend for public and school libraries.” — VOYA

    “...both strong and complete enough to stand on its own.” — BOOKLIST

    ANKIZA


    Gloria Velasquez

    When an interracial couple begins to date, they’re mildly surprised (in ways good and bad) by the unexpected reactions of some of their friends.

    “The author tackles a powerful social issue with compassion and honesty. A good discussion starter with a satisfying ending.” — KIRKUS REVIEWS

    TEEN ANGEL


    Gloria Velasquez

    Celia is a beautiful young girl on the brink of her sophomore year of high school. But when Celia discovers she is pregnant, problems spiral around her. What happens when her fellow students at Roosevelt High find out?

    “[T]he characters and situations are true to life... this book would be an excellent choice for classroom discussions and for reading groups.” — VOYA

    “...one of the best young adult novels on the market today. It is difficult, hopeful and loving.” — NEWS PAGES

    TYRONE'S BETRAYAL


    Gloria Velasquez

    In this seventh novel in the popular Roosevelt High School Series, Tyrone must deal with his feelings of anger and betrayal as the son of an alcoholic, absentee father while struggling to fulfill his dream of attending college.

    “...this book will hold teens’ attention, especially reluctant readers.” — SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL

    “[This series] provides not only positive role models but also constructive ideas for resolving social and cultural issues often facing multiracial teens.”

    RUDY'S MEMORY WALK


    Gloria Velasquez

    Rudy's Memory Walk is the eighth novel in Gloria Velásquez's popular Roosevelt High School Series. This engaging novel for young adults tackles the problem of elderly family members who begin to suffer the effects of Alzheimer's.

    "Educational and at the same time compelling, the novel raises teenagers' awareness on [Alzheimer's]." — KIRKUS REVIEWS

    TOMMY STANDS TALL


    Gloria Velasquez

    Tomás “Tommy” Montoya is a senior at Roosevelt High, previously suicidal and bullied at school because he is gay. The ostracism of gays and lesbians—particularly in Hispanic communities—is a strong theme in the book, though other members of the LGBTQ community are rarely mentioned. When Albert, a fellow student, is badly beaten, Tommy reaches out, sensing Albert is gay and the victim of a hate crime, an action that eventually leads Tommy to found a Gay/Straight Alliance Club. Velásquez paints the issues with a broad brush, portraying the students from the school’s Christian Club as intolerant and giving all characters who display homophobic behavior religious reasoning—an easy polarization that does not line up with reality. Strangely, Tommy’s first-person narration is interspersed with chapters in the voice of therapist Ms. Martínez, an adult, whose story revolves around her suspicion that her younger brother, who committed suicide, was gay. With sometimes-clunky dialogue and minimal characterization, this book is admirable primarily for addressing the plight of gay and lesbian teens in Latino communities.